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Job Scam Warning Signs

If you’re thinking of applying for a job, be wary of suspicious emails that ask you to pay a fee to secure the position or other personal items. We will explore different red flags about job scams in this article so you can avoid these during your job search.

The job requires you to pay a fee up front, or there is a promise of an easy fortune if you pay first.

Scammers often ask job seekers to pay a fee up front, or there is a promise of an easy fortune if you pay first. If they are asking for money, they are not legitimate.

A recruiter pressures you for personal information.

It’s never a good idea to give out personal information to anyone, especially if it involves your legal documents or credit card. But this is especially true if you’re talking with a recruiter who says they have an immediate job offer for you. Recruiters should never pressure you into handing over such information, as they are not authorized to collect it and could be using it without your permission—or worse yet, identity theft!

Let’s take a look at what types of information recruiters shouldn’t ask for:

  • Social Security number
  • Bank account information (e.g., checking account numbers)
  • Legal documents (e.g., birth certificates)
  • Credit card numbers

The recruiter is vague about who they represent and what the job entails.

If the recruiter won’t give you an honest answer, it’s a red flag. You should also be wary if they can’t tell you who your manager will be or what role they’ll have in making your decisions. While some jobs don’t have managers listed as part of the job description, if this is one of them and it seems like a fishy situation, walk away from potential scams by asking for more information before accepting any offers.

The recruiter tells you that you have been selected for hire without interviewing with a manager or doing any sort of pre-employment test.

If you are selected for a job, you should be interviewed by a manager who will evaluate your skill set. You should also be tested on your skills. If the recruiter claims that you have been selected for hire without interviewing with a manager or doing any sort of pre-employment test, it is likely a scam.

You are asked for multiple forms of identification before you have even interviewed for the position.

If a company is asking for your SSN, bank account information, legal documents, driver’s license, or passport before they have even interviewed you for the position and/or given you an offer letter, then don’t be fooled by their promise of employment. These scam artists understand that they can get away with their scams because people are desperate to work and some might not be aware of the warning signs yet.

Be wary of anyone asking for any kind of identification before they’ve even interviewed you or given you an offer letter. The only time anyone should ask for identification is if there’s been some kind of problem with your background check (which is extremely rare). If a company asks for any kind of personal information like this during your interview process, run in the opposite direction (and report them).

You are offered a job and told to accept or decline it on the spot, without enough time to research the company.

If you are offered a job and told to accept or decline it on the spot, without enough time to research the company and ask questions, it’s likely that your interviewer is part of a scam. Legitimate employers understand the importance of giving people time to think about their offer. If you are in any way rushed during the hiring process, it’s best to walk away from that opportunity.

Beware of these warning signs

The job scam is a common problem that can affect a lot of people. It’s important to know the warning signs so you can avoid becoming a victim.

  • The job offer seems too good to be true
  • You’re asked to pay money upfront or before starting work
  • You’re asked for personal information like bank account details, passport numbers, etc…

The best thing you can do is to be aware of these scams and avoid them. If you’re not sure whether a job offer is legitimate or not, call the company and ask for some details about it. If they seem vague or evasive, don’t take the job. It may be tempting to jump on board with a seemingly good opportunity when times are tough but keep in mind that there are lots of other options out there too!

Contact us today if you would like our assistance with elevating your job search. 

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