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How Do You Respond About Salary Requirements?

In a job interview, the question of your salary requirements is an important one. In fact, it’s likely to be the most common question you’ll get asked in any interview. That’s why it’s so important to be prepared for this conversation before going into the meeting. 

If you’re unprepared and make a mistake when answering this question, you could end up losing out on a great job opportunity because of something as simple as being unprepared.

In a job interview, the question of your salary requirements is an important one.

If you’re asked what your salary expectations are, it’s best to answer the question honestly. The interviewer may be looking for a specific range in order to offer you the right job title, or they may be trying to determine if they can afford you based on their budget. If they offer too low of a salary, there may not be much room for negotiation later on in the process if that is allowed by their company policy or union rules.

If it’s difficult for you to answer this question because you aren’t sure where exactly your skills fall within their compensation structure, look up salary data for similar positions at other companies in your area (use Glassdoor), and use this data as a guidepost when answering this question during interviews with potential employers who have specific ranges listed on job descriptions online .

If an employer offers significantly lower than expected after giving them all my information about my experience level etc…then I would thank them but say something like: “I’m sorry but it doesn’t come close enough.” Then ask again how much better off we could get together here?

You should avoid giving a specific dollar figure until you’ve had a chance to understand what the role is and what that role is worth.

You should avoid giving a specific dollar figure until you’ve had a chance to understand what the role is and what that role is worth.

To do this, use your research skills from the previous step to find out what similar positions pay at competing companies. You can also ask for salary ranges from friends or colleagues in your industry/field who may have worked in similar roles at different companies. By using these sources, you’ll have a good idea of how much time, effort and experience are required to perform your duties well—and how much those duties should be paid for.

Give a range based on what you’ve researched about what the position is worth, rather than a specific dollar amount.

When asked about your salary expectations, give a range based on what you’ve researched about what the position is worth, rather than a specific dollar amount. The average annual salary in your field may be one way to go, but if you know that very few people in your area make less than $50,000 per year and plenty of people make over $150,000—instead of saying “I want $75,000,” which would be too low for most positions—you could say something like:

  • “In my research I found that this type of job pays between 80K and 100K annually.”
  • “I’d be looking for something at or above average wages for someone with my skills and experience.”
  • “I’m flexible as long as it’s within reason.”

It’s important to actually research other times this job has been offered so you are sure to ask for a fair amount.

There are a few ways to research the salary range for a job:

  • You can look up an average salary for your profession on sites like Glassdoor, Payscale, Salary.com, SimpyHired, or Comparably
  • You can do an internet search of what companies in your area and industry offer their employees as salaries. This will give you an idea of what other companies pay for this type of position, but it’s important to be aware that individual factors may make this number irrelevant (like if they have a lot more business than usual, or if they’re just starting out).
  • If possible, go directly to the source—ask friends who work at the company about the approach to the salary and if the company pays in the lower or higher end. 

If the salary being offered is significantly lower than you think it should be, find out why before rejecting the offer outright.

If the salary being offered is significantly lower than you think it should be, find out why before rejecting the offer outright. There might be a good reason that isn’t about pay at all. For example, perhaps your new employer has financial constraints and can’t afford to pay higher salaries in general or for your position and job duties specifically. Or maybe they just don’t have any budget left over after paying all their employees what they feel is fair (this may not seem fair but it’s true).

To get a better idea of how much money is involved and whether or not there are reasons why this company can’t afford more than they’ve offered, try asking: “I am really interested in working here and would like to accept this job offer but I’m not sure if we’re on the same page about my compensation expectations.” The interviewer may tell you that she thinks your current experience makes up for any difference between what she can pay and what you want. If so, ask when those raises will come due (and when others will receive them too). Also ask what might change down the road—for example, if there are opportunities for advancement or bonuses based on performance—and whether these could increase your income at some point during employment with this company.

If you’re confident asking for more money once you’re hired, you can try negotiating for that raise at review time or when you take on additional responsibilities.

If you’re confident that you can do the job and want to ask for more money, go ahead and do it. However, if you’re a new hire or aren’t sure of your value yet or are unsure how long it will take before your boss notices how hard you’ve been working—and therefore how much they should pay you—it’s probably not worth asking for more money in that interview.

Just because someone asks for a salary raise doesn’t mean they should get one. The best way to find out whether or not their request is reasonable is by talking with other employees who work there (or similar companies) and seeing what their experience has been like with raises or promotions over time.

Don’t be afraid to negotiate.

Should you disclose your salary requirements? Be careful to answer the question in a way that demonstrates your awareness of your worth and value, while not coming across as arrogant or demanding.

This is important because employers are more likely to pay higher salaries if they know that their candidates are capable of earning more elsewhere (thereby reducing their risk). Your interviewer may ask about salary expectations either because he wants you to set the bar high or low, depending on his budget for hiring someone like you—or because he’s trying to make sure there won’t be any surprises later down the line when it comes time for an offer negotiation. Think carefully before answering this question during an interview; keep in mind these tips:

  • Know what others with similar skill sets are being paid at other companies within your industry
  • Determine what kind of compensation package would be ideal based on factors such as location and job description responsibilities
  • Be ready for pushback from potential employers who aren’t willing (or able) give up what they want out of fear that it will cause problems down the road

Asking for compensation that’s fair is challenging but important.

When you are applying for a new job, there may be an opportunity to ask the interviewer about salary. This is a delicate conversation to have because you don’t want either party to feel uncomfortable or insulted. It’s also important because it can help you determine if this job is worth pursuing or not.

Here are some tips for asking about salary requirements:

  • Research the typical annual compensation range for the position before your interview so you know how much money is fair and reasonable for that type of work. You can use sites as mentioned above as resources for research.
  • When asked about salary requirements, you should always give a range (such as $90,000-$100,000) rather than an exact figure. This is because it’s impossible to know what other companies have offered someone with your background and experience level for this position. Also avoid saying that you’re willing to take whatever they offer; instead focus on how much money you need in order to live comfortably while being able to afford things like vacations and savings accounts.

When asked about salary requirements, it’s important for you to talk about value. When you get paid at your current job, it’s because you add value to your company. If a potential employer wants you on their team, they need to know how much value you can add. The best way to do this is through results from past accomplishments and current achievements that align with the role.

If you need help with perfecting your interview skills, check out our Interview Preparation session for overcoming your obstacles. Contact us for a customized approach to your needs. 

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